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Old 03-07-2013, 09:29 AM   #11
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I had it BAD with both my babies! I can tell you from experience it does get better. By the time my girls were 4-5 months old I had a very "normal" supply and didnt have engorgement or need to pump. I worked closely with my amazing LC to make a plan to get it under control without causing more issues for me and baby. With my DD1 I didnt realize there was anything abnormal about having constantly engorged, spraying breasts until 6 weeks pp. At that point, DD1was having issues from foremilk imbalance and forceful letdown, as a result DD1 was never able to comfort nerse, often fought the breast since she associated it with discomfort and self weaned at15 months. With DD1, I started blockfeeding changing sides every4 hours and pumping 1-2 oz if felt very full after long stretches of sleep or less nursing. I did get mastitis twice and some near misses with clogs, but my supply was "normal" by 4 months. With DD2 I knew it was very likely to have oversupply as bad or worse than the first time, and I was determined to make sure it was only "my" problem and not "our" problem. I contacted my LC while still pregnant and together we read tons of litterature and made a plan. I decided I would never feed from an engorged breast and also never pump to empty the breast. As soon as my milk came in I started block feeding. Before almost every feeding I would pump an ounce or so until my breast was not hard or lumpy....to prevent mastitis and clogs, I was diligent about relieving engorgement in both breasts whenever it happened by pumping a small amount and even got up at night to do so. It worked and didnt get it this time or even have close calls. It is a common misconception that pumping frequently will increase supply....EMPTYING your breasts increases supply so pumping an ounce from an over full breast will not increase supply. Engorgement and milk stasis cause mastits which is awful and you want to do everything to avoid it! Gradually, I stopped getting engorged in normal feeding intervals and only had to express after sleeping longer stretches. I had a normal supply this time by 5 months. DD2 never had green stools, gas, choking, etc from foremilk imbalance and overactive letdown since I was taking off some foremilk before each feeding allowing her to get to the hindmilk. She didnt associate the breast with pain and never fought it (though she did go through a phasd where she would clamp down to slow the flow, ouch). She is 9 months now and is nursing more than DD1did atthis age, so I hope she wont wean as early. I plan to use the same technique if we have another baby.

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Old 03-07-2013, 09:38 AM   #12
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Re: will oversupply ever ease?

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Originally Posted by juliasmom View Post
I had it BAD with both my babies! I can tell you from experience it does get better. By the time my girls were 4-5 months old I had a very "normal" supply and didnt have engorgement or need to pump. I worked closely with my amazing LC to make a plan to get it under control without causing more issues for me and baby. With my DD1 I didnt realize there was anything abnormal about having constantly engorged, spraying breasts until 6 weeks pp. At that point, DD1was having issues from foremilk imbalance and forceful letdown, as a result DD1 was never able to comfort nerse, often fought the breast since she associated it with discomfort and self weaned at15 months. With DD1, I started blockfeeding changing sides every4 hours and pumping 1-2 oz if felt very full after long stretches of sleep or less nursing. I did get mastitis twice and some near misses with clogs, but my supply was "normal" by 4 months. With DD2 I knew it was very likely to have oversupply as bad or worse than the first time, and I was determined to make sure it was only "my" problem and not "our" problem. I contacted my LC while still pregnant and together we read tons of litterature and made a plan. I decided I would never feed from an engorged breast and also never pump to empty the breast. As soon as my milk came in I started block feeding. Before almost every feeding I would pump an ounce or so until my breast was not hard or lumpy....to prevent mastitis and clogs, I was diligent about relieving engorgement in both breasts whenever it happened by pumping a small amount and even got up at night to do so. It worked and didnt get it this time or even have close calls. It is a common misconception that pumping frequently will increase supply....EMPTYING your breasts increases supply so pumping an ounce from an over full breast will not increase supply. Engorgement and milk stasis cause mastits which is awful and you want to do everything to avoid it! Gradually, I stopped getting engorged in normal feeding intervals and only had to express after sleeping longer stretches. I had a normal supply this time by 5 months. DD2 never had green stools, gas, choking, etc from foremilk imbalance and overactive letdown since I was taking off some foremilk before each feeding allowing her to get to the hindmilk. She didnt associate the breast with pain and never fought it (though she did go through a phasd where she would clamp down to slow the flow, ouch). She is 9 months now and is nursing more than DD1did atthis age, so I hope she wont wean as early. I plan to use the same technique if we have another baby.

hmmm wish I knew this before, I've just accepted my situation because my son's doc said that's just how my body is made...oh well maybe its not too late.
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:52 AM   #13
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hmmm wish I knew this before, I've just accepted my situation because my son's doc said that's just how my body is made...oh well maybe its not too late.
Live and learn Go to any BFing support group and you will find half a dozen Moms with low supply getting tons of sympathy and advice on herbal supplements, power pumping and supplementing. Then there is the one oversupply Mom with a gassy, choking, arching bay and 2 rocks for boobs....everyone will tell her "wow, your newborn can eat 5 ozs at a feeding and then you can pump 10 oz for the freezer stash...you are soooo LUCKY "
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:12 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by juliasmom

Live and learn Go to any BFing support group and you will find half a dozen Moms with low supply getting tons of sympathy and advice on herbal supplements, power pumping and supplementing. Then there is the one oversupply Mom with a gassy, choking, arching bay and 2 rocks for boobs....everyone will tell her "wow, your newborn can eat 5 ozs at a feeding and then you can pump 10 oz for the freezer stash...you are soooo LUCKY "
And that is why I avoid breastfeeding support groups.
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:14 PM   #15
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Try not pumping, latching him on, and when your milk drops pull him off and use a cloth to catch the spray. When your breast stops spraying latch him back and he should be able to nurse without "drowning"
This solved our over supply issue
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Old 03-07-2013, 01:57 PM   #16
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And that is why I avoid breastfeeding support groups.
Don't get me wrong...I found great friends and tons of encouragement at these same BFing support groups. It is really hard for someone who hasnt btdt (and especially someone with low supply, who worries about having enough milk at every feeding) to understand how having too much milk could possibly be a problem. Every new Mom worries "Is baby getting enough? Do I have enough milk?" and oversupply is just the less common supply issue and generally I think lots of Moms (like me) struggle with it for weeks before they even recognize it as a problem.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:23 PM   #17
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Re: will oversupply ever ease?

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Originally Posted by juliasmom View Post
Don't get me wrong...I found great friends and tons of encouragement at these same BFing support groups. It is really hard for someone who hasnt btdt (and especially someone with low supply, who worries about having enough milk at every feeding) to understand how having too much milk could possibly be a problem. Every new Mom worries "Is baby getting enough? Do I have enough milk?" and oversupply is just the less common supply issue and generally I think lots of Moms (like me) struggle with it for weeks before they even recognize it as a problem.
I think the worst part is watching your baby suffer, while they simply want to just be fed, but instead they're screaming and beating your chest with their fist, that was the worst. Plus few people understand how stressful this situation is. AND your right everyone does say you are lucky, I sure didn't feel lucky those first few months.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:44 PM   #18
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I think the worst part is watching your baby suffer, while they simply want to just be fed, but instead they're screaming and beating your chest with their fist, that was the worst. Plus few people understand how stressful this situation is. AND your right everyone does say you are lucky, I sure didn't feel lucky those first few months.
Absolutely! It is the only part of my nursing relationship with DD1 that pains me to think about...there were days when she was crying in hunger and pain but the breast was the source of her pain, not comfort My experience nursing my second child has been much easier, and I hope you have the same experience if you have another nursling.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:15 AM   #19
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I can sympathize with you! Poor little guy chokes and sputters when my milk lets down, then pulls off and gets a face wash!

I'm also pumping a lot...at least 50 oz a day (lo is 3 weeks) but I'm ok with that bc I'm a sahm and can dedicate time for that (somehow, with 4 kids 4 & under?) and donate to the milk bank!

So yes, if you want your supply to regulate, pump a little less each week they say, then it will go down with less chance of getting plugged ducts.
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